COVID-19 Information

COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly through close contact from person-to-person in respiratory droplets from someone who is infected. People who are infected often have symptoms of illness. Some people without symptoms may be able to spread virus.

Most if not all the information listed below is direct from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Watch for Symtoms

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.

These symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure (based on the incubation period of MERS-CoV viruses).

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

 

If You Are Sick or Caring for Someone

If you are sick with COVID-19 or suspect you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, you should take steps to help prevent the disease from spreading to people in your home and community.

If you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider for medical advice.

 

Testing for COVID 19

There are laboratory tests that can identify the virus that causes COVID-19 in respiratory specimens. State and local public health departments have received tests from CDC, whereas medical providers are getting tests developed by commercial manufacturers.

How to decide if you should be tested or seek care

Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19. Here is some information that might help you make decisions about seeking medical care or testing.

  • Most people have mild illness and are able to recover at home without medical care. They may not need to be tested.
  • There is no treatment specifically approved for people who have COVID-19.
  • If you think you may be sick, stay home and consult with your healthcare provider on the need for testing.

CDC has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are at the discretion of state and local health departments and/or individual clinicians.

  • Clinicians should work with their state and local health departments to coordinate testing through public health laboratories, or work with clinical or commercial laboratories.